Tag: fall

Butternut Squash Butter

Everyone’s heard of pumpkin butter, but with so much butternut squash at my fingertips, I wanted to make butternut butter.  I used this recipe from Eat, Live, Run as a guide.  Thankfully, I also had one big assistant and one little assistant for the project!

We started by weighing the squash, because the amount of squash will drive how much of the other ingredients you need.  However, I cut way back on the sugar from the original recipe – this squash is so sweet on it’s own, you just don’t need that much.  This scale is truly an antique, but it still works.

 

My big assistant did all the peeling and slicing, and I roasted the squash in the oven.  Then my little assistant helped to measure all the other ingredients and put them in the food processor along with the roasted squash.

 

 

My big and little assistants teamed up for the most exciting part – pushing the buttons on the food processor.

 

 

The original recipe called for putting the mixture on the stove to thicken, but ours was already quite thick at this point.  I did put it on the stove to heat through, but then we were done and ready to put it in glass jars.  The little assistant got a snack of plain yogurt with a spoonful of butternut butter, which he loved!  I spread some on a piece of whole wheat toast later on, and really enjoyed this fall treat.

 

 

Butternut Squash Butter

1 (4 lb.) butternut squash, peeled and sliced thinly
1/4 c. brown sugar
2 1/2 t. pumpkin pie spice
1 1/2 t. vanilla
2 T lemon juice

Place butternut squash slices in a single layer on a cookie sheet and roast at 400F for 20-25 minutes.  Repeat this process until all the squash is roasted.  Place squash, sugar, pumpkin pie spice, vanilla, and lemon juice in a food processor and blend until smooth.  Place mixture in a pan on the stove and cook until thickened, as needed.

-Recipe adapted from Eat, Live, Run

Butternut Squash and Kale Torte

My parents recently took a drive through Rhode Island, and were stunned to see the effects of Hurricane Sandy.  There are so many tragic stories related to this storm.  They saw homes which were flooded, and a landscape redefined by sand which was moved with the power of the wind.  But less than a mile from the beach, farmers were harvesting a large quantity of butternut squash.  So they bought a bushel, which turned out to be 13 butternut squash totaling 40-45 lbs.  That’s a lot of local produce!

The first butternut squash recipe to share is this Butternut Squash and Kale Torte.  With squash, potatoes, kale, red onion, and tomato, this dish is packed with vegetables, and I loved them all.  There’s also both Provolone and Parmesan cheese.  The dish is a series of beautiful layers, and the camera does not do this justice.  The recipe does take a bit of time with all the peeling and slicing, and required about 15 extra minutes in the oven, but the end result is totally worth it.

 

Pumpkin Oatmeal Cranberry Chocolate Chip Cookies

After making two pumpkin recipes last week, I had just 1 cup of pumpkin leftover.  I was saving it for these Pumpkin Oatmeal Cranberry Cookies from the ‘a hint of honey’ blog.  I know, I just made Pumpkin Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies a few weeks ago, but these have even more pumpkin, and chocolate.

It seems like it’s been a long time since I’ve creamed butter and sugar, and making these cookies was really fun.  I chopped a bar of good dark chocolate which was the perfect complement to the dried cranberries.  And the end result is rich, chewy, and delicious.  I better make these last, because I am all out of pumpkin at the moment!

 

 

Spicy Pumpkin Dip

As I mentioned yesterday, our supper club theme this month was ‘Pumpkin’.  By the time I RSVP’d, we already had a menu that included a soup, salad, two main dishes, and dessert.  So I decided to go for an appetizer, and found this recipe for Libyan Spicy Pumpkin DipA little research revealed that the dip is called cershi or tershi and was made by the Jewish community in Tripoli.  If you’re interested in learning more about the culture, there’s a whole movie about The Last Jews of Libya.

There are several versions of the recipe floating around the Internet, but they all call for pumpkin, garlic, and spices.  My dip came out a little spicier than I intended, but I really liked it.  It was good for scooping up with pita, and paired very nicely with a glass of white wine.  If there’s dip leftover, it would also make a great spread for a veggie wrap.  There’s no shortage of pumpkin this year, so pick up a can and give this recipe a try!

 

 

Spicy Pumpkin Dip

1 T olive oil
1/2 c. chopped onion
1 T minced garlic
1 c. pumpkin puree
1 t cumin
1 t paprika
1/2 t ground ginger
1/2 t curry
1/8 t cayenne pepper
2 T tomato paste
2 T lemon juice

Heat olive oil in a frying pan.  Add onion and saute for 15-20 minutes, until soft and beginning to brown.  Add garlic and saute for 1-2 minutes.  Add pumpkin, spices, and tomato paste, and stir to combine.  Add lemon juice, and stir again.  Cook on low heat for 10 minutes, until dip is heated through.

 

Grilled Apple and Cheddar

Grilled cheese just might be my favorite sandwich.  I can eat it for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.  It’s very important that the bread is crispy and the cheese is melty.  (Spellcheck doesn’t like the word “melty”, but you know what I mean!)

This fall, I’ve gotten into a kick of making grilled cheese sandwiches with Cabot 75% Reduced Fat Cheddar and fresh slices of apple on whole wheat bread.  Cheese and apples are always a great combination, and this makes for an awesome sandwich on a chilly day.

 

 

OK, so this isn’t a real recipe, but I do have some important tips.  First, cut the apples slices very thin so they’ll soften slightly as the sandwich cooks.  Second, make sure to place half of the cheese slices under the apples, and half of them on top.  This will ensure that the cheese melts onto both sides of the bread with the apple slices in between.  And finally, serve any remaining apple slices on the side of the sandwich.

I was not paid by Cabot to mention their cheese, and the cheese was not provided to me as a sample.  But I do love the fact that Cabot reduced fat cheeses have a great texture, and really melt when you make a sandwich!

Pumpkin Cornbread

My sweet tooth was satisfied with the Pumpkin Cranberry Oatmeal cookies, but I still had a good amount of pumpkin leftover.  I decided to make this Pumpkin Cornbread from the New York Times.  The recipe is written by Martha Rose Shulman as part of the ‘Recipes for Health’ feature.

I don’t make cornbread often, but it is such a treat to have a piece fresh from the oven.  Even though the recipe calls for a whole cup of pumpkin, the flavor is very subtle.  Unlike other pumpkin cornbread recipes, this one does not call for pumpkin-like spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, or allspice.  It’s really a traditional cornbread with just a hint of pumpkin, which is great for serving with any fall dinner.

 

 

 

Pumpkin Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies

It seems like everyone is talking about the impending bacon shortage.  I can easily do without bacon, but the shortage of canned pumpkin these last few years has been distressing.  Based on a quick scan of my grocery stores shelves, it looks like there is plenty (for now.)  It just isn’t fall without some pumpkin!

I’ve had this recipe for Pumpkin Spiced Oatmeal Pecan Cookies from Skinnytaste bookmarked for almost a year.  I was inspired last week to do a little baking, and this seemed like the perfect choice.  I think pecans would be delicious in this recipe, but I substituted dried cranberries instead.  They added a little bit of color and a touch of sweetness to these chewy cookies.

 

 

This recipe is really easy and uses mostly pantry staples.  The cookies do not spread very much at all, so you can go ahead and place them close together on the cookie sheet.  Although these are lighter than the average cookie, I still made mine fairly small.  They are the perfect addition to your lunchbox or afternoon coffee break.  And I still had over half a can of pumpkin leftover…